• Helen Frankenthaler (American, 1928–2011), Flood, 1967. Acrylic on canvas, 124 ¼ x 140 ½ inches. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Purchase with funds from the Friends of the Whitney Museum of American Art 68.12. © 2019 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photograph courtesy Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

    SPECIAL EXHIBITION ON VIEW

    ABSTRACT CLIMATES: HELEN FRANKENTHALER IN PROVINCETOWN

    August 4–October 27

    Abstract Climates: Helen Frankenthaler in Provincetown highlights key examples of Helen Frankenthaler’s work produced during summers spent in that coastal town and underscores their impact on her development as a painter.

  • Yoonie Han. Photo: Courtesy of the artist.

    FRIDAY NIGHT

    SALON SERIES: YOONIE HAN

    Friday, October 18, 6 pm

    Salon Series, the Parrish Art Museum’s concert program featuring world-class artists performing in an intimate, casual setting, presents pianist Yoonie Han.

  • Laurie Lambrecht, Installation View

    ROAD SHOW ON VIEW

    LAURIE LAMBRECHT: LIMN TO LIMB

    October 5–November 3, 2019

    The Madoo Conservancy
    618 Sagg Main Street, Sagaponack, NY 11962

  • PLATFORM ON VIEW

    OPTOSONIC ECHOES

    August 15–October 31, 2019

    For 2019 Platform, the Parrish Art Museum features a two-part project by the New York City-based artist collective OptoSonic Tea, founded in 2006 by Katherine Liberovskaya and Ursula Scherrer to explore the interaction of live visuals and live audio.

  • Maya Lin (American, born 1959), Bay, Pond, & Harbor (Long Island Triptych), 2014. Recycled silver, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Pace Gallery, New York

    SPECIAL EXHIBITION ON VIEW

    MAYA LIN: BAY, POND, & HARBOR (LONG ISLAND TRIPTYCH)

    June 20, 2019–January 26, 2020

    Bay, Pond, & Harbor depicts three landmark bodies of water on the East End of Long Island: Mecox Bay, Georgica Pond, and Accabonac Harbor. By using recycled cast silver, Lin captures the reflective, precious, and jewel-like quality of water. Through works of extraordinary beauty, the artist asks us to envision waterways as the irreplaceable circulatory system of the planet and consider how our actions can destabilize this fragile balance.

  • Helen Frankenthaler (American, 1928–2011), Provincetown Window, 1963-64. Acrylic on canvas, 82 3/8 x 81 7/8 inches. Collection of Josh and Beth Friedman. © 2019 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photograph by Tim Pyle, Light Blue Studio, courtesy Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York

    NEWS

    Exhibition Note

    The New Criterion | October 1, 2019

    “In the Parrish’s spacious galleries, the “climate” of these works is one shimmering with light.” -Andrew L. Shea

PLEASE NOTE: FROM OCTOBER 7 TO NOVEMBER 9, ONE OR MORE OF OUR PERMANENT COLLECTION GALLERIES MAY BE TEMPORARILY CLOSED AS WE INSTALL OUR NEW EXHIBITIONS.  THE HELEN FRANKENTHALER EXHIBITION IS ON VIEW IN ITS ENTIRETY THROUGH OCTOBER 27

UPCOMING EVENTS

EDUCATION PROGRAMS

Family Programs
Explore exhibitions and create art together through hands-on activities using varied art materials and techniques.
Children's Programs
Workshops and hands-on art making with artists and Museum educators designed for children ages 5 to 12.
Teen and Adult Workshops

Workshops and classes for teens and adults: painting outdoors, life drawing, still life painting, collage.

EDUCATION PROGRAMS
museum, creative, east end

William Merritt Chase (American, 1849–1916) The Big Bayberry Bush (The Bayberry Bush), ca. 1895. Oil on canvas, 25 1/2 x 33 1/8 inches. The Parrish Art Museum, Water Mill, New York, Littlejohn Collection

THE PERMANENT COLLECTION
AND ARTIST STORIES

The Parrish Collection is now available digitally. View and learn about individual works and get information on art works in the Parrish Permanent Collection.

Artist Stories is a unique collection of historic photographs, biographical information, and maps. Explore the dynamic history of artists who visited, lived, or worked on the East End of Long Island from the 1820s to the present.

 

Special thanks to The Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation for their support to make this scholarship accessible.