Special ExhibitionS ON VIEW

  • Helen Frankenthaler (American, 1928–2011), Provincetown Window, 1963-64. Acrylic on canvas, 82 3/8 x 81 7/8 inches. Collection of Josh and Beth Friedman. © 2019 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photograph by Tim Pyle, Light Blue Studio, courtesy Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York

  • Helen Frankenthaler (American, 1928–2011), Cool Summer, 1962. Oil on canvas, 69 ¾ x 120 inches. Collection Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York. © 2019 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photograph by Rob McKeever, courtesy Gagosian Gallery

  • Helen Frankenthaler (American, 1928–2011), Orange Breaking Through, 1961. Oil on canvas, 95 x 93 inches. Private Collection. © 2019 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photograph by Michael Cullen, courtesy Private Collection

  • Photo: Jenny Gorman

  • Photo: Jenny Gorman

  • Photo: Jenny Gorman

  • Photo: Jenny Gorman

  • Photo: Jenny Gorman

  • Photo: Gary Mamay

  • Painters Joan Mitchell (left), Helen Frankenthaler (center), and Grace Hartigan (right) at the opening of an exhibition of Frankenthaler paintings at Tibor de Nagy Gallery, 1957. Photograph by Burt Glinn. Courtesy Magnum Photos

  • “Women Artists in Ascendance: Young Group Reflects Lively Virtues of U.S. Painting,” Page spreads from LIFE Magazine, May 13, 1957. © 1957 Time Inc. Photographed by Gordon Parks.

  • Frankenthaler in Fiat “Jolly,” 622 Commercial Street, Provincetown, summer 1961. Courtesy The Dedalus Foundation, Inc.

  • Jeannie and Lise Motherwell’s lemonade stand, Frankenthaler second from right, 622 Commercial Street, Provincetown, July 4, 1962. Courtesy The Dedalus Foundation, Inc.

  • Frankenthaler swimming in front of her home and studio, “Sea Barn,” 631 Commercial Street, Provincetown, circa summer 1966. Photograph © Dan Budnik, All Rights Reserved. Courtesy Helen Frankenthaler Foundation Archives, New York

Abstract Climates: Helen Frankenthaler in Provincetown

August 4–October 27, 2019


Abstract Climates: Helen Frankenthaler in Provincetown highlights key examples of Helen Frankenthaler’s work produced during summers spent in that coastal town and underscores their impact on her development as a painter. Beginning with work from the summer of 1950, the exhibition and accompanying catalogue focus on the artist’s output from the late 1950s through 1971. Abstract Climates illuminates Frankenthaler’s exploration of the relationship between landscape and abstraction, and offers new insights into the major role her work played…

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  • Laurie Lambrecht, Installation View

  • Laurie Lambrecht (American, born 1955), Barkcloth, Guilin, China, 2009. Image courtesy the artist.

  • Laurie Lambrecht (American, born 1955), Work in progress for Parrish Road Show. Image courtesy the artist.

Parrish Road Show 2019: Laurie Lambrecht
Limn to Limb

October 5–November 2, 2019


The Madoo Conservancy 618 Sagg Main Street Sagaponack, NY 11962 Hours: Fridays and Saturdays Noon–4:00 pm   RELATED PROGRAM Friday, November 1, 6 pm Road Show Artist’ Talk Now in its eighth year, the Parrish Road Show is the Museum’s annual creative off-site cultural engagement program. Every year, East End artists are invited to create new work for temporary projects and engage residents in their process. In an effort to deeply connect art and creativity to…

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OptoSonic Echoes

August 15–October 31, 2019


OptoSonic Echoes is an 8-channel continuous sound installation positioned at the exterior of the Museum’s north entrance, containing the voices and sounds of participants in the September 27 performance, OptoSonic Tea @ the Parrish, an evening-length group improvisation featuring some of the world’s most innovative video and sound artists. Conceived by OptoSonic Tea founders Katherine Liberovskaya and Ursula Scherrer, OptoSonic Echoes was put together by composer Michael J. Schumacher using recordings provided by the artists.…

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  • Maya Lin (American, born 1959), Bay, Pond, & Harbor (Long Island Triptych), 2014. Recycled silver, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Pace Gallery, New York

  • Maya Lin (American, born 1959), Bay, Pond, & Harbor (Long Island Triptych), 2014. Recycled silver, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Pace Gallery, New York

  • Maya Lin (American, born 1959), Bay, Pond, & Harbor (Long Island Triptych), 2014. Recycled silver, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Pace Gallery, New York

Maya Lin: Bay, Pond, & Harbor (Long Island Triptych)

June 20, 2019–January 26, 2020


On Long Island, you’re surrounded by water on both sides; you’ve got the bay coming up separating the North and the South Forks. I am extremely interested in the water’s edge, and thinking about sea level and understanding how transmutable and temporal that boundary between land and sea actually is. I’m very committed to doing something to help us understand and move quicker. I think this is going to be a huge part of our…

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  • Joe Zucker (American, born 1941), Boxing Rounds #13, #14, and #15, 1981. Acrylic, cotton, Rhoplex on canvas, and enamel on wood, 73 x 73 inches each. Extended loan from the Collection of Robert S. Taubman, Courtesy of Marlborough Contemporary, New York and London

Joe Zucker

On view through October 6, 2019


THE BOXER In the 1950s art critic Harold Rosenberg coined the term “action painting” to describe the work of the Abstract Expressionists, confirming that a painting was not just a surface on which to paint a picture but one on which to record an event or “action.” The painter Willem de Kooning expanded on Rosenberg’s idea by declaring that the canvas, where the act of painting took place, was the “arena” in which an artist…

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